Case Study 3 Cynar Plastics to Diesel (2013)

Case Study 3 Cynar Plastics to Diesel (2013)
  • Waste to Energy

Case Study 3 Cynar Plastics to Diesel (2013)

Cynar has been developing its pyrolysis technology since 2004 and installed its first full scale plant in County Laois, Ireland in 2008. In 2011, S I T A U K , o n e o f t h e c o u n t r y ‘ s l e a d i n g recycling and resource management companies and a subsidiary of French firm Suez Environment, signed an exclusive agreement with Cynar to build the UK‘ s f i r s t fully operational plants to convert —end of life plastic“ (ELP) into diesel fuel in a contract valued at £70m. SITA is planning to construct up to 10 plants, each with an annual throughput of 6,000 tonnes of plastic waste, producing approximately 5.7 million litres of synthetic fuel. The Cynar Technology produces a synthetic fuel that is clean, low in sulphur and has a higher cetane number than generic diesel fuel. S I T A U K ‘ s a g r e e me n t t hew i t h C y UK as it attempts to deal with mixed waste plastic with a solution that is both environmentally efficient and energy productive. Feedstock: The Plastics to Fuel facility will process 6,000 tpa of ELP. A MRF is co-located on the Resource Recovery Park and it is estimated that up to 10% of residue from the MRF (600 tpa) will be used as fuel for the Cynar plant. As a rule of thumb, approximately 950ml of oil can be recovered from 1kg of plastics such as Polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS). Plastics recovered from the household kerbside collection are generally an ideal feedstock for the Cynar plant. Agriculture plastic waste is suitable, such as silage film, which is mainly polyethylene-based. Pallet wrap and stretch wrap form the commercial waste stream is typically based on low and linear-low density polyethylene and makes ideal feedstock. Feedstock challenges: The pyrolysis process is more suited to certain feedstock than others and this was a challenge during the development of the technology. For example, some plastics such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), nylon, polyurethanes and rubbers may cause difficulties. PET contains oxygen atoms, which take part in the oxidation reactions that can turn the plastic waste into a sludge-like substance. PVC contains chloride ions than produce unwanted hemicals such as hydrochloric acid and a range of dioxins.
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